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sociology

Take Root: A Reproductive Justice Panel

Date: Oct 8, 2019 (Tuesday)

Light Lunch Reception: 11:15am-12:15pm, Multipurpose Room, WTY Library
Panel: 12:30-1:45pm, UKAA Auditorium, WTY Library
Evening Reception: 5-7pm, Lyric Theater 
 
As part of the Year of Equity programming, this panel brings together organizers, activists, and healthcare providers from national organizations red states to discuss challenges, approaches, and perspectives in advancing reproductive justice. Centering on the experiences and leadership of women, trans, and non-binary people of color, this panel will present latest community research, initiatives, and advocacy on reproductive justice.
 
Panelists, in alphabetical order, include: 
In addition to the Year of Equity, this event is co-sponsored by the departments of Anthropology, Gender and Women Studies, Sociology, and Writing, Rhetoric, and Digital Studies; the Office of LGBTQ* Resources, the Center for Health Equity Transformation, the Center for Equality and Social Justice, Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women's Health, the National Advocates for Pregnant Women, and Kentucky Health Justice Network. 
 
 

 

Date:
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Location:
William T. Young Library Auditorium

People Behind Our Research: Claire Renzetti

 

 

Claire Renzetti is the Judy Conway Patton Endowed Chair in the Center for Research on Violence Against Women and chair of the sociology department at the University of Kentucky. Focusing on rape crisis counseling and violence in lesbian relationships, Renzetti seeks to produce knowledge that improves the quality of women's lives.

Produced by Research Communications at the University of Kentucky.

 

 

Tips for NSF proposals in the Social Sciences

Dr. Jeffrey Mantz will go through the basics of NSF applications, talk about specific programs, and give some general grant writing advice. Mantz is Program Director in Cultural Anthropology and Human Subjects Research Officer at the National Science Foundation, where he has served since 2012. He holds a PhD in Anthropology from the University of Chicago and has previously taught at George Mason University, Cornell University, California State University at Stanislaus, and Vassar College. His own research takes him to the Caribbean and Central Africa, where he explores issues related to inequality, resource extraction, and commodity supply chains.

Date:
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Location:
18th Floor, Patterson Office Tower
Type of Event (for grouping events):

SWAP Talk with Kathryn Engle and Jasper Waugh-Quasebarth, 2016 Recipients of Eller & Billings Student Research Awards

This SWAP (Sharing Work on Appalachia in Progress) event will feature talks by two recipients of 2016 UK Appalachian Center Eller and Billings Student Research Awards.  Kathryn Engle presents Stinking Creek Stories: Life, Agriculture, and Community in Rural Southeastern Kentucky; Jasper Waugh-Quasebarth presents "You can make a tree sing: that's the magic": Musical Instrument Makers and the Re-enchantment of Livelihood and Material in West Virginia.  Both awardees are UK Graduate Students.  This is a free event for UK Students, Faculty, and Staff!

Date:
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Location:
UK Appalachian Center

SWAP Talk, Appalachia Kentucky Up Close: Population Trends and Projections for Eastern Kentucky Counties

Please, join us as we welcome Julie N. Zimmerman for a SWAP (Sharing Work on Appalachia in Progress) Talk here at the UK Appalachian Center on Wednesday, September 14, 2016 from 12 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.  Dr. Zimmerman is a Coughenour Professor of Rural Sociology and works with the Departments of Sociology, Community and Leadership Development, and Appalachian Studies.  Her talk is entitled Appalachia Kentucky Up Close: Population Trends and Projections for Eastern Kentucky Counties.  This is a free event for UK Students, Faculty, and Staff!

 

Date:
-
Location:
UK Appalachian Center

Sociology Professor’s High Ranking Article Explores School Dress Codes, Discipline

by Guy Spriggs

For almost 3 years, the Open Syllabus Project (OSP) has collected and analyzed syllabi to shed light on what texts are assigned in college courses. The Project boasts a catalog of 1.1 million syllabi, and its insights were chronicled in a January 2016 feature in the New York Times titled, “What a Million Syllabuses Can Teach Us.”

SOC 350: Food & Society in Asia with Prof. Keiko Tanaka

Prof. Keiko Tanaka was interviewd for Dan Wu's Food Evangelist show on WLXL, Lexington Community Radio.  She is talking about her SOC 350 course called Food & Society in Asia (“Ramen as Japanese Soul, Curry as British Might).

jpst224 Sun, 03/27/2016 - 12:08 pm
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