News

8/24/2016

Margaret McGladrey, a graduate student in the Department of Sociology, has published a study "Becoming Tween Bodies: What Preadolescent GIrls in the US Say About Beauty, the 'Just-Right Ideal,' and the "Disney Girls'" in the Journal of Children and Media. A blog post on ChildrenAndMediaMan about the study was recently published here. You can read the full study here

McGladrey is the Assistant Dean for Research in the College of Public Health and a doctorate student at the University of Kentucky. This study resulted from her thesis project for her master's program in Communication at the University of Kentucky. Her

8/23/2016

Lee Mengitsu, a junior pre-journalism major and sociology minor, recently had a blog published titled "We Did the Crime, We Did the Time. Now Let Us Vote." on Generation Progress. Read the blog here. In the blog, Mengitsu discusses the barriers former felons face when returning to society, namely voting rights. 

8/15/2016

By Gail Hairston

Kentucky is privileged with a bounty of railroad museums and attractions, but the Elkhorn City Railroad Museum has a charm and history all its own.

With its unique collection of railroading tools, equipment, uniforms and instruments; enhanced by books and photos; and personalized by retired railroad employees eager to share their tales of life on the rails, the Elkhorn City Railroad Museum preserves and protects Eastern Kentucky’s pride and culture as well as its hope for the future.

This past spring semester, University of Kentucky sociology students in Associate Professor Shaunna L. Scott’s “Sociology of Appalachia” class were quick to recognize the potential of the small museum

7/11/2016
University of Kentucky Professor of Sociology Claire Renzetti was recently selected as the recipient of the prestigious 2016 Peterson-Krivo Mentoring Award by the American Sociological Association’s Section on Crime, Law and Deviance and its Section on the Sociology of Law.   The award was established to recognize the sustained and innovative work of a distinguished faculty member in the mentorship of undergraduate students, graduate students and junior scholars in the field. One award recipient is selected every two years through a competitive nomination process.    Renzetti is currently chair of the UK College of Arts and Sciences Department of Sociology, the college's diversity and inclusion officer and the Judi Conway Patton Endowed Chair for Studies of Violence Against Women. Her research interests include
7/7/2016

By Mallory Powell

Growing up in Hazard, Kentucky, Brittany Martin was familiar with diabetes. Many of her older relatives had been diagnosed with the chronic condition, and her younger family members were starting to develop it as well. In a state with one of the highest rates of diabetes — 11.3 percent of adults had a diagnosis in 2014 —Martin’s family wasn’t out of the ordinary, but she found the status quo unacceptable.

Since she graduated from the University of Kentucky in 2014 with a dual degree in biology and sociology, Martin’s family history and her interest in health have converged in her current role as coordinator of the Big Sandy Diabetes Coalition (BSDC), where she serves as an AmeriCorps Vista volunteer. The coalition, based at Big Sandy

6/7/2016

By Jennifer T. Allen

The 25th volume of Social Theory journal disClosure was recently released focusing on the topic of “Transnational Lives.” The issue’s theme brings together a variety of genres, including creative pieces, analytical articles, interviews and art, as it explores concepts related to the topic.

“Simple words such as ‘home’ or ‘religion’ take on an entirely new meaning when they are considered across transnational spaces,” said Catherine Gooch, co-editor of the issue and graduate student in the Department of English. “In addition, there are larger implications both on a personal and public level. If we think about our economic system and how globalization has caused capitalism to expand transnationally, around the world, we see how this economic expansion impacts everything from our personal lives to the higher education system.”

Dr. Mahmood

5/24/2016

by Guy Spriggs

For almost 3 years, the Open Syllabus Project (OSP) has collected and analyzed syllabi to shed light on what texts are assigned in college courses. The Project boasts a catalog of 1.1 million syllabi, and its insights were chronicled in a January 2016 feature in the New York Times titled, “What a Million Syllabuses Can Teach Us.”

As the OSP continued the enormous task of looking through syllabi for resources and assignments, it also released the Syllabus Explorer, a search function which enables visitors to see what texts are most commonly assigned by location and field of study. It was around this time that UK sociology professor Edward Morris received a phone call from his mentor from graduate school.

“She sent me a link and said I had to check it out,” he explained. “I had no idea, because you don’t know when your work is being taught. I was

4/28/2016

By Gail Hairston

(April 28, 2016) — For decades, researchers and scholars have studied what some call the “racial achievement gap” in academics and careers, without having a clear understanding why such a gap exists. 

Edward Morris, associate professor of sociology and director of undergraduate studies at the University of Kentucky College of Arts and Sciences, and Brea Perry, associate professor of sociology at Indiana University, assert that racial disparities in academic achievement constitute “one of the most important sources of American inequality.”

“Racial inequalities in adulthood — in areas as diverse as employment, incarceration and health — can be clearly traced to unequal academic outcomes in childhood and 

4/19/2016

Amanda Bunting was awarded the Presidential Graduate Fellowship. This award is for currently enrolled Graduate Students in the amount of $20,000, plus a tuition scholarship and student health insurance.

The Presidential Fellowship is made available for a continuing student who demonstrates outstanding academic merit and research capabilities in their field of study and has a graduate grade point average of 3.7 or above.

Kaitlyne Motl was awarded the A&S Certificate for Outstanding Teaching. The College of Arts & Sciences has established the Certificate for Outstanding Teaching award to recognize excellence in undergraduate instruction by teaching assistants. Fifteen Teaching Assistants in Math/Sciences, Social Sciences, and Humanities related courses will receive a certificate and monetary award.

Kaitlyne also won a dissertation

3/21/2016

By Gail Hairston

(March 18, 2016) — Shaunna L. Scott, associate professor of sociology and director of the Appalachian Studies program at the University of Kentucky, is co-editor of a book chosen as the 2015 Weatherford Award winner for nonfiction.

"Studying Appalachian Studies: Making the Path By Walking," edited by Chad Berry, Phillip J. Obermiller and Shaunna L. Scott (University of Illinois Press), is a collection of essays reflecting on the scholarly, artistic, activist, educational and practical endeavor known as Appalachian Studies. Following an introduction to the field, the writers discuss how Appalachian Studies illustrates the ways interdisciplinary studies emerge, organize and institutionalize themselves, and how they engage with intellectual, political and economic forces both locally and around the world.

Weatherford Award judges in nonfiction say

1/14/2016

Dr. Alan J. DeYoung, professor in the College of Arts & Sciences Department of Sociology and professor of Educational Policy Studies and Evaluation in the College of Education, has been selected by the US Department of State and the International University for the Humanities and Development (IUHD) in Turkmenistan to serve as Fulbright Specialist in the spring 2016 semester. This project is coordinated by the U.S. Embassy in Ashgabat, Turkmenistan. Dr. DeYoung will work with local university staff on the continued development of their specialization in sociology by reviewing their new curriculum and giving lectures to students of that department as a visiting speaker. 

IUHD is a new educational institution, which started offering its 14 different majors with English as the medium of instruction this academic year. DeYoung will also work with the teaching staff of the

12/7/2015

By Whitney Harder, Elizabeth Adams

(Dec. 7, 2015) — A student falling behind in math class at William Wells Brown Elementary counted figures on a color-coded worksheet aloud with help from a guest tutor on Oct. 23.

On her first day as a volunteer, Jenna Hatcher, a University of Kentucky College of Nursing associate professor, pulled a chair up to the young girl’s desk in the hallway of the school, providing individual attention as they solved problems as a pair. For Hatcher, who is more accustomed to teaching students at the doctoral level, working with a young mind was a refreshing reminder of the curiosity and enthusiasm at earliest stages of learning.

“The most special thing about reaching out to local children at a young age is the ability to work with them while they are still so open and innocent,”

11/23/2015

By Whitney Harder

(Nov. 23, 2015) — Seven faculty members from the University of Kentucky have been selected to participate in the 2015-16 SEC Faculty Travel Program. The program, in its fourth year, provides support for faculty to collaborate with colleagues at other SEC member institutions. 

UK faculty participants include:

Brad Berron, assistant professor in the Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, will travel to the University of Florida; Bradley Kerns, assistant professor in the School of Music, will travel to the University of Tennesee;
11/17/2015

By Gail Hairston

(Nov. 16, 2015) — Two films highlighting America’s racial conflicts will be shown on the University of Kentucky campus this week, with time scheduled for discussion afterward.

At 6 p.m. today, the documentary “Let the Fire Burn,” will be shown at the UK Athletics Auditorium in William T. Young Library, followed by a panel discussion hosted by the UK Martin Luther King Center and the College of Arts and Sciences’ Department of Gender and Women’s Studies and the African American and Africana Studies Program. 

“Let the Fire Burn” recounts the 1985 tragedy when Philadelphia police, with authorization from the mayor, responded to a stand-off with a black liberation group the city was trying to evict from its communal house in West Philadelphia by dropping a firebomb on the roof, burning the house to the ground and killing 11 MOVE members, five of them

10/30/2015

By Whitney Harder

(Oct. 30, 2015) — Like the University of Kentucky itself, the UK College of Social Work was established to fulfill a need in Kentucky, one for the college that began in the 1930s with the Great Depression and continues to evolve today.

Emerging from the Great Depression, the nation was dealing with a number of social issues, including one-third of the workforce being unemployed. The widespread suffering helped catalyze the establishment of the Social Security Act of 1935, which brought immediate relief to many families with a system of retirement benefits, old age pensions and aid to dependent children.

Qualified personnel were needed to staff these programs and so the social work profession flourished, ideally situated to expand along with these social policy changes, and the need for

10/15/2015

By Tasha Ramsey

Populism, a political discourse that promises to empower and include the poor and the excluded, is one of the most important political forces in Latin America, Europe, and the U.S. According to Dr. Carlos de la Torre, a sociology professor in the College of Arts & Sciences, populism is “a Manichaean political rhetoric that aims to rupture the existing institutional system to include the excluded.”

Carlos de la Torre received his Ph.D. in sociology at the New School for Social Research, New York, in 1993. He has been a fellow of the Guggenheim Foundation, the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars and the Fulbright Foundation. Since 1989 he has published on the relationship between populism, authoritarianism and democratization.

Dr. de la Torre released his new book titled, “De Velasco a Correa, insurrecciones, populismo, y elecciones

10/14/2015

By Dara Vance

At the American Sociological Association (ASA) 2015 annual meeting in Chicago, Ill., in August, Sociology Associate Professor Carrie Oser received the “Senior Scholar Award” from the Alcohol, Drugs, & Tobacco section. This award is given annually to one scholar for their outstanding scientific contributions to the sociological examination of alcohol, drugs, and/or tobacco.  Oser, who is the youngest scholar to ever receive the award, was selected from an international field of scholars. 

Carrie Oser has been a faculty member in the Department of Sociology at UK since 2006. Her research interests include addiction health services, health disparities, HIV risk behaviors/interventions, as well as drug use among rural, minority, and criminal justice populations. 

As part of her commitment to innovation in education, she and a colleague, Michele

10/6/2015

By Gail Hairston

(Oct. 6, 2015) — The images of untold thousands of people — many of them children — escaping the horror and despair of the war-ravaged Middle East are seared in the memories of anyone even semi-aware of global events in recent months.

Newscasters and reporters around the world have failed to find the words to adequately describe and explain the tsunami of humanity that washed upon the shores or stumbled across the borders of European nations. So many questions and so few answers.

panel of nine experts from six disciplines was formed by the University of Kentucky’s International Studies Program and its director Sue Roberts to help the campus community better understand

9/17/2015

Lindsey Funke, a student in the College of Arts & Sciences participated in College's education abroad program in Oaxaca, Mexico this past summer. Funke's work and experiences during her time with SURCO are documented in a story map that she created. The story map can be viewed here.

SURCO is a non-profit grassroots organization combining consulting, academic programs and local activism. Classes and discussion within SURCO focus on political ecology, political economy, land tenure, indigenous struggles, militarism, environmental challenges, and much more. Each field trip compliments a topic or topics discussed in lectures. 

Students from all universities are encouraged to apply. Apply early to take advantage of your

9/16/2015

By Alicia Gregory

(Sept. 16, 2015) — University of Kentucky REVEAL Research Media presents an inside look at the UK Center for Research on Violence Against Women. This is the nation's only center focused solely on research to address and prevent gender-based violence.

Interviews include:

Diane R. Follingstad, Director & Women’s Circle Endowed Chair
, Professor in Psychiatry & Psychology Ann L. Coker, Verizon Wireless Endowed Chair
, Professor in OB/GYN & Epidemiology Claire M. Renzetti, Judi Conway Patton Endowed Chair
, Chair & Professor in Sociology Charles R. Carlson, Robert H. & Anna B. Culton Endowed Professor
, Professor in Psychology Heather M. Bush, Kate Spade & Company Endowed Professor, Professor in Biostatistics

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