mcllc

Grant Enables Philosophy Student to Help Homeless Teens in Lexington

By Gail Hairston
 

Christoph Mayer, Eurovision Song Contest: A European Festival of Camp Culture

Christoph Mayer, Eurovision Song Contest: A European Festival of Camp Culture

Part of the University of Kentucky, College of Arts and Sciences' Year of Europe celebration.

In conjunction with:

Hispanic studies - hs.as.uky.edu Modern & Classical Languages, Literature & Cultures - mcl.as.uky.edu Jewish Studies - jewishstudies.as.uky.edu/ Musicology - finearts.uky.edu/music/

MCLCC Presents: Wicked Souls and Bodies

Wicked Souls and Bodies: Evil Spirits, Sexuality, Gender, and Violence in the Lore of the African Diaspora Jacqueline Couti, Gisele Anatol, Paula Sato, Matthew J. Pettway University of Kentucky Wednesday, February 3, 2016, 5:00pm to 7:00pm, Fine Arts Library, Study Room 1

While the African diaspora generally describes the dispersal(s) of African-descended peoples throughout the world from modernity to the present, it demands the sighting of various contexts, causes, results, and memories. This symposium’s focus on the African diaspora as articulated in transatlantic contexts provides a platform that underscores diversity and the human condition in a national and transnational manner. The cultural, linguistic, ethnic/racial, and generational dynamics of the Black Atlantic provide a fruitful intellectual context for exploring the roles of problematic acts of agency in oppressive spaces.

MCLLC Graduate Committee Meeting

Date: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 3:30pm to 4:30pm
Location: 
1045 POT
Tags/Keywords:

College of Arts and Sciences Recognizes Its Award-winning Faculty

The University of Kentucky College of Arts and Sciences will honor its faculty at 4 p.m. today at the William T. Young Library Auditorium.

The 2015-2016 Outstanding Teaching Award Recipients Announced

There will be an Awards Ceremony to honor the recipients of these and other College awards on Wednesday, April 22 at 4 pm in the WT Young Auditorium. A reception will follow the ceremony.

Misogyny: French and Italian, Medieval and Modern

 

Writings composed to reveal and denounce the defects and crimes of women was a recognized genre in the Middle Ages, and it generated both amusement and dismay. While the intertextual richness of misogynous writing has long been established, these texts don’t just faithfully parrot each other—they often play on each other to subversive effect. I’ll look at several French and Italian texts that aren’t so well known even in medieval French and Italian studies, and show how they interact in unexpected ways to nuance their misogynous claims. I’ll also spend some time on modern misogynous genres, surprisingly (if unintentionally) faithful to their medieval antecedents. 

F. Regina Psaki is the Giustina Family Professor of Italian Language and Literature at the University of Oregon. She publishes on Boccaccio, Dante, and medieval courtly genres, translating chivalric romances from French and Italian: Il Tristano Riccardiano (2006),Le Roman de la Rose ou de Guillaume de Dole (1995), and Le Roman de Silence (1991). With Gloria Allaire she co-edited The Arthur of the Italians (2014); with Thomas C. Stillinger she co-edited Boccaccio and Feminist Criticism (2006).

Her current project, The Traffic in Talk About Women: Misogyny and Philogyny in the Middle Ages, explores the lively medieval genres of anti-woman diatribes and defenses of women and shows the range of opinion in medieval writers on the nature and behavior of women (and, in some cases, of men). 

Date: 
Saturday, April 25, 2015 - 1:30pm to 3:30pm
Location: 
Bingham Davis House

Global Literacy Brings the World Closer

The University of Kentucky Department of Modern and Classical Languages, Literatures and Cultures (MCLLC) in the College of Arts and Sciences is changing how we think of language studies.

Slaymaker Translates Hideo's New Book on Words Without Borders

Excerpts from Doug Slaymaker’s translation of Furukawa Hideo’s latest book “Horses, Horses, in the Innocence of Light” will be published on the online journal Words Without Borders today and Thursday.

How Did Japan Survive One of the World's Worst Natural Disasters

The University of Kentucky Japan Studies Program presents the documentary 『ほんとうの歌』 ("True Songs") March 11.

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