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chemistry

Blue, Kekenes-Huskey, Miller, and Odom Recognized in College of Arts & Sciences Awards Ceremony

Four faculty members from the Chemistry Department received recognition for awards received from the College of Arts and Sciences for their efforts in teaching, mentoring, outreach, and service in an  Faculty Awards Ceremony to recognize their accomplishments on Tuesday, April 25 at 3:30 pm in the W.T. Young library auditorium. 

Eugene and Guzman reveal how sunlight can spark chemical reactions in clouds, fog, and mist

Atmospheric aerosols such as smoke, fog, and mist are made of fine solid or liquid particles suspended in air. In the lower atmosphere aerosols play a major role in controlling air quality, as well as in scattering and absorbing sunlight. This interaction of aerosols with light varies widely and depends on their complex chemical composition that rapidly changes under the governing highly reactive conditions found in the atmosphere. Importantly, the mysterious formation of carbon-containing atmospheric particles has intrigued atmospheric scientists during the last decade.

Glazer research group's work highlighted on the back cover of the European Journal of Inorganic Chemistry

A research study performed by Dr. Dmytro Havrylyuk, Dr. David Heidary, Leona Nease, Dr. Sean Parkin, and Dr. Edith Glazer was profiled on the back cover of the journal The European Journal of Inorganic Chemistry for a special cluster issue titled "Metal Anticancer Complexes – Activity, Mechanism of Action and Future Perspectives". 

A collaboration of the Guzman group results in a new idea that connects the synthesis of clays and the origin of metabolism.

The question of how life has begun has fascinated scientists from many disciplines and it was the organic chemist Graham Cairns-Smith who proposed the theory for the origin of life starting from clays instead of polymers such as RNA.

 Illustration that connects the synthesis of clays and the origin of metabolism. Credit: Ruixin Zhou  Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-04-idea-synthesis-clays-metabolism.html#jCp

Corrine Elliott receives Undergraduate Award in Organic Chemistry from the American Chemical Society

Corrine Elliott was recognized as the American Chemical Society's Division of Organic Chemistry as the most outstanding, senior organic chemistry student at the University of Kentucky. Selection is based on aptitude for organic chemistry as evidenced by formal course work as well as research accomplishments during the course of their undergraduate studies, and lastly by a desire to pursue a career in chemistry.

Anne-Frances Miller Chosen as Next President Elect of the Division of Biological Chemistry in the American Chemical Society

Professor Anne-Frances Miller was chosen as the next President Elect of the Division of Biologial Chemistry in the American Chemical Society (ACS). This 7000-member technical division of the ACS hosts section meetings, administers awards, supports regional meetings and encourages participation of biochemists in the ACS.  Prof. Miller’s two-year term begins on January 1, 2017.  

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