News

04/09/2014

Quantitative Initiative for Policy & Social Research

                           

by Thomas Janoski

(April 9, 2014) — In an effort to train University of Kentucky graduate students and help researchers, the Quantitative Initiative for Policy and Social Research (QIPSR) is bringing four of the most sophisticated methodologists in America for a mini-conference April 10-11 and a workshop May 15-18 on structural equation models (SEM). This method goes far beyond the typical single equation explanation of social science voting, health, participation, protesting or learning. It encompasses the combination of up to hundreds of variables into a complex system of meaningful behavior.

Judea Pearl, the award-winning philosopher and computer expert, refers to it as a method of “pivotal importance” that can

04/03/2014

By A&S Staff

Ana Liberato, an associate professor in the Department of Sociology has been awarded a grant from the Swiss National Science Foundation, and she will be a visiting fellow at the Swiss Forum for Migration and Population Studies at the University of Neuchâtel (SFM) this summer.

“The Forum is a great fit given its commitment to support multidisciplinary migration research and research that examines the cultural, political and economic outcomes of migration and globalization,” Liberato said.

Liberato is working on a book project about the settlement and incorporation of Dominican immigrants in Switzerland. The

04/01/2014

By Mary Venuto

One day while waiting at the dentist’s office sociology associate professor, Edward Morris, picked up a Newsweek magazine that depicted a group of elementary aged boys bleakly staring back at the camera. The headline read “The Boy Crisis: At Every Level of Education They’re Falling Behind. What to Do?” This prompted Morris to write his book, “Learning the Hard Way,” as a way to give a sociologically informed response to this social issue.

“I was interested in how the article framed the educational underperformance of boys: as uniform across all groups of boys…and as a zero-sum game where if girls progress, boys lose out.”

Thus began Morris’ six year study on understanding the

03/25/2014

Ron Eller

by Gail Hairston

(March 25, 2014) — An appearance by Ellen Goodman, Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist, author, speaker and commentator, on March 27 kicks off the two-day Conference on Political and Economic Inequality, hosted by the University of Kentucky Department of History in the College of Arts and Sciences.

Ron Formisano, UK’s William T. Bryan Professor of History and organizer of the conference, said he was inspired to create the conference because “inequality is a major issue in the world today.

“But (inequality) is of particular importance in the U.S. because the U.S

03/14/2014

Breaks Interstate Park

by Gail Hairston

(March 14, 2014) ― The natural beauty of the Elkhorn City/Russell Fork region of Pike County, Ky., is undeniable. It is home to part of the Breaks Interstate Park, referred to by some as the 'Grand Canyon of the South.' And yet tourism, especially adventure tourism, is still a slowly developing factor in the local economy. Locals want to know why.

The Elkhorn City Heritage Council is trying to promote recreational and outdoor tourism in the area. University of Kentucky and Eastern Kentucky University students and faculty have been asked to assist in those efforts by gauging public opinion.

March 20-23, a group of UK students will go door-to-door surveying residents of Elkhorn City to find out more about their visions of the community's economic future and community assets. A group of

03/13/2014

"Homecoming" is from his work "War is Personal."

by Whitney Harder, Whitney Hale

(March 11, 2014) — Eugene Richards, a photographer, writer and filmmaker known for capturing moments of political activism and social issues in his work, will give the final presentation in the 2013-14 Robert C. May Endowment Photography Lecture Series with a lecture at 4 p.m. Friday, March 14, in Worsham Theater at the University of Kentucky Student Center. In conjunction with the talk, an exhibition of Richards' work will be on display March 14 through April 27, in the Art Museum at UK. The lecture and exhibition are free and open to the public.

Richards launched his career

03/12/2014

Woodland Glen 2

                                                   

by Carl Nathe

(March 12, 2014) — Encouraging sustainability practices and awareness of environmental issues is at the heart of a new Living Learning Program (LLP), which will make its debut this fall at the University of Kentucky.

Greenhouse is a partnership between the College of Agriculture, Food and Environment (CAFE) and the College of Arts and Sciences (A&S).  The co-directors from CAFE are  faculty members Carmen Agouridis, Department of 

03/11/2014

Lynch Hotel

by Whitney Hale, Whitney Harder

(March 11, 2014) — University of Kentucky Libraries Special Collections is illuminating the rich culture of Appalachia and challenging stereotypes of the region with its "Immigrants in the Coalfields" exhibit on display now in UK's Margaret I. King Building. The free exhibition will be open to the public 9 a.m.- 5 p.m. Monday through Friday until April 4.

Images, maps, documents and oral histories from UK Special Collections tell the story of Appalachia unheard to many, a mix of cultural, ethnic, and racial identities and a cultural mosaic illustrated in the coal camps of Eastern Kentucky.

Visitors to the exhibit first experience a national perspective of Appalachia, often stereotypes like

03/10/2014

Recently Dr. Edward Morris was published in the online blog Gender & Society in which he discussed his lasest book titled Learning the Hard Way.  The book discusses the underperformance of boys in school by approaching actual students to view education from the boys' points of view.  It also investigates the gender gap that can be found in education.  The whole article can be found here.  

02/28/2014

by Gail Hairston   LEXINGTON, KY (Feb. 28, 2014) — The Committee on Social Theory Spring Lecture Series continues its review of global financial markets as Greta Krippner is set to discuss “The Crisis in Market Regulation” at 2 p.m. Friday, Feb. 28, on the 18th floor of the Patterson Office Tower.  

Krippner finds that state policies created the conditions conducive to “financialization” that solved some policy dilemmas of the 1970s and 1980s, but created major weaknesses that would ultimately fail in the new millennium.

Financialization of the economy was not a deliberate outcome sought by policymakers, but rather an inadvertent result of the state's attempts to solve other problems, especially the stagnation and deregulation in the 1970s and 1980s, the encouragement of foreign capital in the U.S. economy, and large trade imbalances caused by direct foreign investment.

02/27/2014

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 27, 2014) – As part of "¡Viva Mexico!," University of Kentucky Libraries presents "Alebrijes of Oaxaca, Mexico: an Exhibition of Mexican Folk Art from the State of Oaxaca." Showcasing more than 30 Oaxaca alebrijes on loan from UK faculty members' personal collections, the free public exhibit is on display through April 25, in the atrium of the William T. Young Library.

Whimsical carvings depicting animals, people, objects and imaginary creatures, alebrijes are known for their paintings of intense colors and intricate patterns. Carved from the twisting branches of the copal wood, the figures are sanded and painted with a base coat of paint. The final painting is done meticulously with detailed designs and vibrant colors

12/16/2013

UK undergraduates

by Jenny Wells

(Dec. 16, 2013) — The University of Kentucky Office of Undergraduate Research has honored 18 students with the Oswald Research and Creativity Program awards.  Representatives from the Office of Undergraduate Research, along with director  Diane Snow, presented the winners with certificates at a reception on campus Dec. 5.

Established in 1964 by then-UK President John Oswald, the Oswald Research and Creativity Program encourages research and creative activities by undergraduate students at UK. The objectives of the program are to stimulate creative work by undergraduate students and to recognize individuals who demonstrate outstanding achievement.

Categories include Biological Sciences; Design, including architecture,

11/14/2013

Group photo

by Ann Blackford

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 14, 2013) — University of Kentucky students are participating in a unique learning opportunity for the first time this semester with incarcerated individuals from Kentucky's Blackburn Correctional Complex (Blackburn), a minimum-security Lexington prison.

The UK College of Social Work  and Department of Sociology are partnering with the Kentucky Department of Corrections to pilot a new innovative course called "Drugs and Crime, An Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program Course.” The course, which meets once a week at Blackburn, brings 16 college students (from the outside) together with 16 persons who are incarcerated (from the inside) to study as peers in a seminar behind prison walls.

The course examines the use and abuse of alcohol and drugs

11/13/2013

Courtney Lynch graduated from UK earlier this year with a B.A. in sociology.

The oldest of three children, she says she has been accustomed to setting an example for others to follow. She says that’s also spurred her to take advantage of every opportunity that comes her way – at UK that meant travelling to over 15 countries in one calendar year, and after graduation participating in AmeriCorps Public Allies Program at the Legal Aid Society of Greater Cincinnati.

She was accepted to Harvard Law, where she is in the midst of her first semester. A&S recently caught up with the Newport, Ky., native to talk about what drew her to sociology, her time studying abroad, and some of her goals for the future.

A&S: Where are you from and how did you decide on UK? 



CL: I am from Newport, Ky., and a 2008

11/07/2013

 

video courtesy of UK Public Relations & Marketing

article by Jenny Wells

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 7, 2013) — In addition to research presentations, the 2014 National Conference on Undergraduate Research (NCUR) will offer numerous volunteer opportunities for the entire campus community when the University of Kentucky hosts the conference April 3-5, 2014. From helping direct traffic, to managing technology, to just helping students find where they need to go, there will be a variety of positions available to students, faculty and staff.

Students will have even more flexibility to get involved, as the University Senate has given permission for faculty to redirect their classes April 3 and 4 so students can attend conference events and presentations. 

"This is a bit unusual; it's a new twist on

Martin Luther King, Jr.

by Gail Hairston

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 7, 2013) — Members of the public and especially young people are encouraged to attend "Aiming for New Heights," a celebration of the Lexington Congress on Racial Equality (CORE), the group of black and white individuals largely responsible for Kentucky’s civil rights movement.

The unique event takes place from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 9, in the University of Kentucky Student Center Annex. 

The day includes presentations, panel discussions and exhibits about the civil rights era in Kentucky, most commonly identified as dominating the 1960s, although some scholars date African Americans’ struggle for equality from the post-Civil War Reconstruction era of the late 19th century. For many, the highlight will be an exhibit of wax figures depicting Kentucky’s CORE

11/06/2013

AMI students at work.

by Nathan Owen

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 6, 2013) — The University of Kentucky’s Appalachian Center, in collaboration with the Appalachian Media Institute, will provide a glimpse into Appalachia through a showcase of young filmmakers’ documentaries.

The event takes place at 3:30 p.m. on Monday, Nov. 11, in Room 106 of the Whitehall Classroom Building. Representatives from AMI’s Summer Documentary Institute will screen three self-produced documentaries, each around 10 minutes long.

"Perceiving Perfection," produced by Austin Rutheford, Dustin Hall and Jade Slone, examines the ways mass media and everyday life affect how individuals perceive themselves. "Breaking the Cycle," produced by Alessandra D’Amato, Brian Dunn and Christian Adams, takes a look at recovery from domestic abuse through the stories of a mother and son. "A Mother’s Choice," produced by Drake Hensley,

10/24/2013

By Victoria Dekle

90 miles to the north of Lexington on the banks of the Ohio River is the “The Queen City.” The nickname itself could probably be the topic of a panel discussion when the 37th annual meeting of the National Women’s Studies Association (NWSA) rolls into town in early November. There will be presentations, roundtables and workshops about anything and everything relating to critical studies of gender, from the ways gender is taught, experienced, and promoted in society including higher education.

Most notably, GWS chair Karen Tice will be headlined in an innovative feature of this year’s conference, the Authors Meet Critics roundtable. It is an event in which authors of recently published books hear and respond to comments from experts in

10/15/2013

Pharmacy student Christopher Terry (left), health sciences student John Wright Polk IV and pharmacy student Brette Hogan posed with a Tsáchilas community member in Ecuador.

                                   

by Claudia Hopenhayn

(Oct. 15, 2013) — Shoulder to Shoulder Global recently led 49 University of Kentucky students, faculty, staff and community members in a multidisciplinary health brigade experience to Santo Domingo, Ecuador.

STSG is a UK-based organization that strives to improve the health and well-being of impoverished communities while offering learners the opportunity to work in a multicultural and interdisciplinary setting.

The brigade, which took place Aug. 2-11, was the culmination of months of preparation that included the credit-bearing course, "Interprofessional Teamwork in Global Health." Throughout the course, students learned about Ecuador, how to work in an interprofessional environment and how to apply basic principles

10/02/2013

Prescription Drug Abuse

By Allison Elliot-Shannon 

(Oct. 2, 2013) — The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) has launched the Juvenile Justice Translational Research on Interventions for Adolescents in the Legal System (JJ-TRIALS). Seven research centers, including the University of Kentucky Center on Drug and Alcohol Research (CDAR), will work together to determine how juvenile justice programs can effectively adopt science-based prevention and treatment services for drug abuse and HIV.

According to recent estimates, approximately half of all teens who enter the juvenile justice system need treatment for substance use disorders. The remaining half would benefit from a drug abuse prevention intervention.

Many evidence-based interventions targeting adolescent substance abuse and HIV screening, assessment, prevention, and treatment

Pages

X
Enter your Sociology username.
Enter the password that accompanies your username.
Secure Login

This login is SSL protected

Loading